Home » Archives for October 2016

Month: October 2016

October 29, 2016

1) People

You’ve pared the list to three top candidates for a new position. You could make the final hiring decision yourself. But looping your staff into the process by having them meet and weigh in on finalists could be your team’s next great development opportunity. Learn how mastering the art of the interview debrief can give you important insights into staffing strengths and weaknesses.
by Christian Bonilla on Fast Company


2) Strategy

For new or transitioning executives, formulating a bold corporate strategy takes time. But you can make strides without making waves. Put your focus on constraints, disruption, and scaling, for example. Then stop any activities that no longer make sense for the business. Want to uncover more going-forward opportunities — for any company leader? Answer these seven critical questions.
by Ajit Kambil on Deloitte University Press


3) Execution

Talk to me: Customer engagement through social media sounds great. It provides direct access to clients, immediate feedback opportunities, and instant solutions to customer problems. But instant access can backfire, and relying on technology to solve complex problems can leave consumers feeling cold. Learn how getting social in the wrong situations could hurt your business.
by Knowledge@Wharton


4) Cash

How many fast-growing companies have suffered — or died — because their focus was on sales, with no budget for growth? Wisely budgeting for capital expenses can help ease growing pains when things turn critical. We know — practical thinking won’t excite shareholders and could put a strain on cash flow. But is there anything sexier than the prospect of money in the bank?
by Melissa Browne on CEO Magazine

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October 15, 2016

1) People

To keep up with growth, Ernst and Young plans to hire more than 15,000 employees during the next fiscal year. Mixing modern and traditional recruiting tactics, the firm hopes to catch the attention of both top-notch experienced workers and new college grads. Luckily, you don’t need to go on a hiring blitz to reap the benefits of a Big Four strategy.
by Jared Lindzon on Fast Company  


2) Strategy

Like a good parent, a strong leader would rather set a model example than court popularity. Consider the cases of these CEOs: When faced with crises at JetBlue, Tylenol, and Xerox, they took drastic action. Their gambles worked, but at the time, they had no idea what the outcome might be. Find out how these three CEOs’ unpopular decisions saved the day.
by Han-Gwon Lung on Business Insider


3) Execution

Get out there and live digital; develop new models to appeal to consumers in a digital world; interact with customers on whatever channel they use. These are just a few of the insightful gems shared at Festival of Marketing 2016 by leaders from BP, KLM, Unilever, and more. Ready to raise your digital marketing game? Grab more ideas right here.
by Sean Hargrave on CMO


4) Cash

According to research by McKinsey & Company, businesses that regularly shift resources to areas that need them most create more value and deliver higher returns to shareholders. Yet one-third of companies surveyed reallocate only one percent of their capital year to year. Boost your company’s value by adopting these four principles.
by Yuval Atsmon on McKinsey&Company

October 8, 2016

1) People

Men and women in the workplace: They share office space, attend the same meetings, and compete for the same jobs, yet the similarities end there. Men get better access to senior leaders, more challenging assignments, and more promotions than their female counterparts. Want your company to close its gender gaps? Companies like Twitter, Procter & Gamble, and American Express show you how.
by Nikki Waller on The Wall Street Journal


2) Strategy

Are your consumer research tools outdated? Companies that use big data are gaining an advantage over businesses that stick with traditional tactics. Even if you’re not quite ready to invest 100% in advanced analytics, you can get better answers from strategies that mix old and new techniques. Grow your business and please your customers with these five research approaches.
by Jonathan Gordon, Volker Grüntges, Vicki Smith, and Yvonne Staack on McKinsey&Company


3) Execution

As many as 75% of corporate innovation projects fail. Turns out coming up with ideas isn’t the problem—execution is. That’s because most innovation teams spend too much time mulling over concepts instead of taking action. Giving in to the inclination to explore, test, and experiment is just one innovation pitfall holding companies back. Unclog your innovation pipeline by adopting a “Design to Launch” approach.
by Gordon Hui on Chief Executive


4) Cash

New SEC rules governing money market funds take effect October 14, 2016. Foreign and domestic banks are curtailing issuance of commercial paper, opting instead to shift billions out of prime funds and into government money markets. How will this shift impact rates? Here’s the lowdown.
by Richard Teitelbaum on The Wall Street Journal

October 1, 2016

1) People

Please stay: Are the reasons employees are choosing your company—and staying years after hire—what you think they are? While most employers think they grasp what workers value most, the reasons behind those preferences are misunderstood. Explore what lies beneath employees’ top retention factors—fair pay, career advancement, job security, and trust.
by Stephen Miller on SHRM


2) Strategy

Most people don’t think of commerce as an arty sort of endeavor. But creative innovation has never been in greater demand. You don’t have to be in Silicon Valley to build a creative think tank. Most great ideas and discoveries came about through creative exploration, testing, and failure. Don’t limit your company’s chances for greatness. Make space for creativity today.
by Amy Whitaker on Yale Insights


3) Execution

What can a modern-day sales pro learn from a 1940 training guide? A lot. Though technology and the pace of business have changed how current sales managers enable their reps, the goal—providing resources to help maximize every client interaction—remains the same. Learn how lessons from the past can move your sales enablement function into the future.
by Jim Ninivaggi on Selling Power


4) Cash

Misclassifying employees, forgetting to pay overtime, failing to keep up with new tax laws: These common payroll errors can hurt your business. Outsourcing payroll is one way to solve the problem, but maybe you don’t need to go that far. Payroll software will catch some blunders, but that tactic alone won’t solve the problem. Ease payroll pain with these tips.
by Geoff Williams on American Express Open Forum