Home » Archives for April 2017

Month: April 2017

April 29, 2017

1) People

Five Commonalities of a Winning Corporate Culture

In the war for talent, there’s no better weapon than a strong corporate culture. But building an environment that resonates with leaders and employees doesn’t happen overnight — values-based cultures must be honed and nurtured over time. What’s the key to making those values stick? Leaders who live, breathe, and model every belief — and know the corporate value system starts with them. Does your culture have what it takes to win? Check it against these five characteristics.
by Teresa Jacques on Talent Economy


2) Strategy

CEO Fiascos Typically Start With a Lack of Empathy

Bosses behaving badly: New examples crop up daily, whether you’re watching the evening news or checking in on social media. While the companies and circumstances may change, a common theme winds through every incident: The leaders who are “losing it” lack empathy. And if a company’s CEO seems incapable of compassion, where does that leave its employees? Here’s how environments without empathy are damaging businesses.
by Mark Murphy on Forbes


3) Execution

Spice Up Your Campaigns — and Partnerships — With “Practical Creativity”

Did you know that 56 percent of their clients believe ad agencies care more about selling ideas than solving problems? It’s true. And who can blame them when so many agencies seem to prioritize their work going viral over their client’s long-term success? Here’s how steering away from marketing that’s “crazy sexy cool” could actually make your business stand out.

by Steve Randazzo on CMO


4) Cash

When Money Gets in the Way of Corporate Ethics

From Wells Fargo to United Airlines to Fox News, we have plenty of recent examples of businesses choosing money (and bad behavior) over ethics. With the possibility of less government enforcement on the horizon, how far might some businesses go to test the limits of acceptable behavior? Here’s how cuts to the U.S. Justice Department’s budget could impact corporate ethics. We’re pretty sure it won’t be pretty.
by Peter J. Henning on the New York Times

 

April 22, 2017

1) People

Giving Employees Raises Is Better for the Bottom Line

While most business leaders are willing to try creative gimmicks to improve employee performance, few consider the option most likely to make a difference: higher pay. In 1914, industrialist Henry Ford decided to invest in his workers by paying them five dollars a day — double the average wage for automakers at the time. In return, he got better productivity and record profits; absenteeism dropped. Here’s how raising wages can help your business reach new heights of productivity and engagement.
by Dan Price on Success


2) Strategy

Five Questions Leaders Should Be Asking All the Time

Want to inspire your staff, help them generate new ideas, and keep their focus on what’s truly important to the business? Then don’t stop asking questions. Hit your colleagues and teammates with “I wonder if…” and “Couldn’t we at least…” and even “Wait, what?” Questions like these spark creativity, curiosity, and deeper thinking. They also show you’re paying attention and are willing to challenge the status quo to make things better. There are five essential questions you can ask — check them out now.
by James E. Ryan on Harvard Business Review


3) Execution

What’s Missing in Most Marketing Programs? Verbal Imagery

We’ve all heard the saying “A picture is worth a thousand words.” If a consumer can attach an image to an advertising slogan, they’ll be more likely to remember — and buy — what you’re selling. It’s possible with verbal imagery, an advertising tactic that uses words to conjure images and form emotional connections with consumers. Customers who feel personally connected to a product or brand are more likely to repeat purchases, become brand advocates, and promote products to friends and family. Get details here.
by Al Ries on Ad Age


4) Cash

Four Pitfalls Keeping Big Companies From Getting Bigger

Bureaucracy. Fear of failure. Short-termism. Lack of resources. These are the “growth anchors” weighing down the progress of many large companies today. To burst the chains binding their businesses, corporate leaders are reaching out to start-up entrepreneurs to learn how to think and behave with the agility of smaller companies. Want to cast off the anchors weighing your business down? Follow these tips.
by David McCann on CFO

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April 15, 2017

1) People

Getting More Women Into the C-Suite Means Keeping Them in the Talent Pipeline

Research suggests that women face three unique decision points biologically and culturally at pivotal moments in their careers. Anticipating the Launch, the Mid-career Marathon, and the Executive Transition — and having resources readily available to help leaders and employees navigate through them — is vital to keeping women on track and rising within the talent pipeline. Wondering just how to get more women into your executive suite? Here are the steps to take.
by Sally Blount on Kellogg Insight


2) Strategy

Should You Revise Your Operating Model? Six Points to Consider

Just as the body cannot move without the spine, a business cannot survive without a strong operating model — the “secret sauce” that defines how your business will generate profits for the company and also deliver value to its customers. Why? Because that model is what gives a business its competitive edge — and once that’s gone, frankly, so’s the business. If your company has lost its mojo, take a step back and look at the big picture. Is it time for an operations overhaul? Follow this six-point checklist and decide.
by Mark LaScola on CEO


3) Execution

5 Mistakes to Avoid in Your Voice of the Customer Program

A key error that companies make when trying to launch a Voice of the Customer (VoC) program? Using freeware products that aren’t designed — or equipped — to support such a sophisticated endeavor. Think about it: Happy returning customers are the key to real business success. Aren’t they worth investing in? Move these items to the top of your “To Do” list:  1) Garner the support of your leadership team, 2) Invest in the right tools, and 3) Empower your people to act. Follow these tips — and a few more.
by Sean McDade on Business2Community


4) Cash

Why Business Owners Should Never Pay Bills On Time

Business owners who negotiate realistic payment terms with their vendors aren’t being shady — they’re being smart! It might seem counterintuitive, but if you want to create a solid foundation for your business, think twice about paying your bills on time. Here’s how strategically stretching out your payments can increase your cash on hand, avoid your getting caught in a cycle of running your business to pay your vendors, and build financial stability that will allow your business to grow.
by Louis Mosca on Forbes

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April 8, 2017

1) People

The Three Things Best-in-Class Companies Are Doing Today to Advance Women

Take a good, hard look at the middle tier staff roles in your organization. Are they mostly held by women? If so, how many are likely to move into senior roles? Best-in-class companies like 3M and Rockwell Automation, honored recently with 2017 Catalyst Awards for their work in advancing women, aren’t settling for the status quo. Nor should you. Three themes have emerged from recent events celebrating breakthrough initiatives that companies are implementing; adopt them to elevate your women’s leadership strategy.
by Jeffery Tobias Halter on the Huffington Post


2) Strategy

The Power of And

Imagine someone asking his boss for permission to work from home one day a week. If she said, “I understand you want more flexibility, but we need employees to be onsite,” he’d probably brace himself for rejection. Yet if she altered one word and ended the sentence this way: “…and we need employees to be onsite,” he might have reason to feel optimistic. Life these days is full of paradoxes. Here’s how embracing the power of and could help you as a leader achieve more positive results.
by Eric J. McNulty on strategy+business


3) Execution

Customer Reviews: Ignore at Your Product’s Peril

According to recent data, 85% of tech buyers read multiple online reviews before deciding to buy. While loading your product page with positive testimonials might seem like the thing to do, having a few negative reviews in the mix might be better for business. That’s because negative reviews make the positive ones more believable — plus they create opportunities to build loyalty and trust by showing your customers you care. Here’s how connecting with customers over a bad review can result in consumer advocacy.
by Adrienne Weissman on CMO


4) Cash

CFOs Are the New Digital Apostles

No longer content to simply oversee a company’s financials, today’s CFOs are folding enterprise-wide digital development into their purview. Stop and think about it: Isn’t your financial leader most qualified to link digital technologies to ROI? Artificial intelligence, robotic process automation, and blockchain are just the beginning. Here’s what you need to know to transform your CFO into a digital finance trailblazer.
by David Axson on Accenture

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April 1, 2017

1) People

The War for Talent Is Over, and Everyone Lost

Some recruiters believe that up to 75% of the overall workforce is dissatisfied enough with their current jobs to consider other opportunities. With entrepreneurship and self-employment tempting workers both young and old, companies are finding it harder than ever to hire top talent. Plus bias-prone hiring methods and cumbersome performance review processes aren’t exactly enticing people to stay on the corporate ladder. Find out how the quest for talent veered off course and how to get it back on track.
by Dr. Tomás Chamorro-Premuzic and Adam Yearsley on Fast Company


2) Strategy

How Companies Can Champion Sustainable Development

The public sector’s recent retreat from global goals on climate change and sustainable development has created gaps that advocacy groups, customers, investors, and employees are calling on the private sector to fill. Using a framework provided by the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals, “inclusive innovators” like Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, MasterCard, and Southwest Airlines are stepping up to answer the call, allocating resources to address planetary issues while fulfilling business goals. Here’s how.
by Bhaskar Chakravorti on Harvard Business Review


3) Execution

The Truth About (Inside) Sales Call Coaching

Provide call coaching for your inside sales reps and your business is sure to benefit. At the very least, revenue will spike and attrition problems will resolve, right? Well … maybe. Formal coaching programs can help reps do 10–60 percent better on meeting quotas — but meanwhile, coaching has been identified as the “number one” worst sales management skill. That’s because most managers lack the time and talent to be good coaches. To increase your team’s likelihood of coaching success, follow these guidelines.
by Lauren Bailey on Selling Power


4) Cash

Assessing the Financial Risk of a Customer Before You Start Doing Business

Business owners trying to build a successful enterprise aren’t inclined to turn down potential customers. Even so, there’s nothing wrong with making sure each client has the ability to pay on time — and in full — more often than not. To separate the rascals from the reliable, don’t be afraid to apply some tough love: Issue credit applications, check credit reports, and ask for bank references. A little due diligence will go a long way in building a financially stable client base; these seven tips will get you started.
by Barry Moltz on American Express

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